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My version of jiffy reefing.

stnick

lee nicholas
I use ball herring blocks attached to the cringle of the sail with a SS ring. So I dead end the reef line back of the sail on the boom. Than up to the block and down again here I turn it ball bearing turning block to forward turning block and up to the sail again to another block w/ bearings and down to mast mounted turning block.
Than down the mast and turning blocks to line stoppers and winch.
With my Saber i could first reef inside a tack ! fast and smooth
i know most will hate this idea..
But i'm open to all suggestions.
M 384/ Fla
 

yurek

Jerzy Borzym
I would like to explore more reefing systems we are using on Morgans.
I will have two ropes for each reef line running to the cockpit.
with garhauer clutches and ST 30 winches on cabin top.
I have main halyard and topping lift in the cockpit as well.
It worked well on my previous 30 footer.
Right now I have to decided on reefing lines: polypropylen ?
Spectra ?, Vectran ?, 3/8 ?, 7/16 ?.
What works for You ?
Yurek
 

datswite

Ken Ferrari
I have kept everything at the mast for simplicity. I installed a reefing winch at the mast right below the gooseneck. I have also lashed low-friction rings to the reefing cringles along the leech of the mainsail using small diameter dyneema cordage and run the reefing lines through the rings to reduce friction. The reefing line is dead-ended around the boom, goes up through the low-friction ring, down to the outhaul, forward through the boom to the cam cleats and finally down to the winch. Simple, low-friction and bullet-proof. With the third reefing line, it gets a little messy at the gooseneck. However, I'd much rather have that mess there than piled up in the cockpit. We already have jib sheets, the mainsheet, the two traveler lines, the headsail furling line and the preventer lines in the cockpit. I cannot imagine cluttering it up even more with a mainsail halyard, topping lift and 3 reefing lines! Some people do not like to leave the cockpit offshore. I do not mind. In fact, I do daily deck inspections while offshore - checking for chafe, securing lines, etc. So, I'm practiced. I can tie in a reef or shake one out in no time.

Here is a video of my crew member, Yves, tying in the 3rd reef on our transatlantic last year. You can see that most of his effort is spent simply getting the lines ready. Actually tucking in the reef took less than 60 seconds. And it's not his boat! I can do it even faster. Remember, this is the 3rd reef - theoretically the most difficult one to tie in, and Yves had it set in no time. This video was recorded two weeks into our passage with winds forward of the beam, and Yves was just finishing up his night watch. The entire crew was exhausted, and it still went easily!

 
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yurek

Jerzy Borzym
Ken, thanks for info, but it triggers more questions.
Do you use original clutches on the gooseneck?
what line size you are using for reefing?
I'm thinking about 7/16 but maybe is to thick for boom pulleys.
What size is your main at third reef ?
for third reef I'm planing to have top of mainsail at spreders high. Should i go lower?
I'm not planing to install storm sail.
I have detachable stay for small jib and running backstays at spreder high.
I have to make this decision before I go to sail maker.
Yurek.
 

datswite

Ken Ferrari
I have upgraded my boom, so I no longer have the original Kenyon spar and clutches. However, my new boom is very similar to the Kenyon, i.e. the lines are all internal and there is a turning block in the forward end of the boom with a single lever cam clutch/cleat. My boom only has 2 clutches, so I installed a horn cleat below the reefing winch for the third reef. My reefing lines are just regular 3/8" yacht braid. You don't need anything fancy in this application. A little smaller than your proposed 7/16", but plenty strong.

I cannot give you the exact measurements of my third reef. I added it to the mainsail after it was already built. A full-length batten pocket prevented optimum placement, so the sail is still a TINY bit too big with the 3rd reef. The head is just above the spreaders. The next sail I have made (HAHA) will have a properly placed 3rd reef - likely just below the spreaders. We used the 3rd reef A LOT on our crossing. The wind was forward of the beam for 16 of the 18 day trip to the Azores. And it rarely dropped below 20 knots. In fact, we had a week of 25-30 knot winds. That third reef allowed us to sill make progress. And, it allowed us to heave-to in 35 knot winds, gusting to 48. You will not regret having it!

Here is an excellent article regarding reefing point placement. This article might be behind a paywall. If you don't already subscribe, I highly recommend it. It's easily the best $20 bucks I spend every year. Reefs: How Many and How Deep
 
Ken,
This is a good discussion,
Thank you for posting your video. Very informative. My boat is rigged with reef lines on the Stbd. cabin top within the dodger. All rigged for cockpit sheet handling just as we bought Sonata. I was also thinking of moving clutches to the mast/boom. There is a lot of clutter at the cabin top around and companionway. I think we have 4 clutches and traveller cleats on either side!
I also feel it is good idea to get out of the cockpit as well, and know what is going on, out on deck.
Thank you,
Mitchell
 

datswite

Ken Ferrari
Ken,
This is a good discussion,
Thank you for posting your video. Very informative. My boat is rigged with reef lines on the Stbd. cabin top within the dodger. All rigged for cockpit sheet handling just as we bought Sonata. I was also thinking of moving clutches to the mast/boom. There is a lot of clutter at the cabin top around and companionway. I think we have 4 clutches and traveller cleats on either side!
I also feel it is good idea to get out of the cockpit as well, and know what is going on, out on deck.
Thank you,
Mitchell
Yes, that sounds very cluttered! Having all of those lines in the cockpit of a big boat is one thing, but it seems like chaos in a 38' boat. And, really, how hard is it to go to the mast?!? I always get a kick out of those boats that have the halyard at the mast but the reefing lines in the cockpit, or vice versa. What a pain in the ass that has got to be!
 
I'd need to go count how many halyards there are on Sonata. At least they did bring one Main halyard into the same bank of clutches on the cabin.
Mitchell
 
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