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Cutlass Bearing Replacement

captrob

Robert Cohen
I just resently purchased a Morgan 382. The cutlass bearing
has noticable play (read more than exceptable). I plan on
replaceing it during sprig hall out. Anybody have any experience
replaceing a cutlass bearing in one of these "beasts"? I would
be interested in your approach and any suggestions on thing to do
or not do (as the case may be).
 

dgh462

Dennis Honeycutt

Victor,
I replaced my cutlass bearing on my 382 last spring. I was able to disconnect the shaft coupling and move it forward just enough to get the prop off without removing the rudder. It was tight, but effective. The bearing came out with any problem. There are two (possible more) set screws in the shaft log which hold the bearing in place and those must be removed before bearing removal can occur. When inserting the new bearing, I insearted the new bearing, leaving about 1/4 inch exposed from the log, marked with a pencil the location of the set screws, removed the bearing and drilled an indention in the bearing for the screws to set in, put some Sikaflex sealer on my finger, "greased" the inside of the shaft log with it, inserted the new bearing into the log while aligning the set screw indents, replaced the set screws, reconnected the shaft coupler and I was finished. If your shaft log is worn to the point of excessive play in the shaft, then you might have to build up the inside of the shaftlog with expoxy. I didn't have to do that, thank goodness!
Good luck.
Fred
 

bschnur

Barry Schnur
Fred,
I was wondering if the prop could be removed without having to pull the rudder -- that's good news.
Regarding what you said about installing a new Cutless bearing, what's the purpose of the Sikaflex? I thought that stuff was a sealant or something similar. Why use sealant at all? Wouldn't it make the bearing that much harder to change the next time? I have no first-hand experience with changing one of these bearings, so please excuse my ignorance.
Jim

 

budfet

bud fetter
It's been awhile, but I know that I had to remove the rudder to replace the cutlass bearing. That's not all that bad however and while doing it you can repack the rudder post and service attachments to the rudder and perhaps install a PSS dripless shaft seal. Weather a sealant is used on the cutlass bearing is determined by the tightness of the fit.
 

captrob

Robert Cohen
<div>Fred,How did you remove the cutlass Bearing without removing the shaft and where are the set screws that hold the cutlass inplace and where are they accessable from (inside the boat under the stuffing box boot?). Thanks for your response by the way.

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dgh462

Dennis Honeycutt
Victor,
After disconnecting the shaft coupling which connects the shaft to the transmission, I was able to slide the shaft far enough forward to allow the removal of the prop. The bearing was loose enough to slide out through the shaft log . The set screws are located on the outside of the boat where the shaft exits the hull (the shaft log). They were difficult to find, I had to dig around a bit until I found them.
Fred
 

dgh462

Dennis Honeycutt
Jim,
There are two versions of Sikaflex, one is a bonding agent or an adheasive for things you will not ever want to remove, (like 3-m 5200) the other is similar to calking. I used it mainly to give slightly more holding power to the bearing, the boat yard manager recommended doing that. I left about 1/4 inch of the bearing exposed to provide a "grab" area for the next time I might need to remove it.
Fred
 

dhoneycutt

Dennis Honeycutt
Victor
different morgans had different cutlass designs. mine no 74 has no set screws and has a nurrled exterior and mus be split to remove. This per Pete Brown. Also when replaceing look for the cause of the problem. in my case it is motor mount failure in one case and brittleness on the other 3. failure was caused by diesel fuel drip.
 
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