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chain plate bolts

terry_thatcher

Terence Thatcher
One of our members posted some time ago that he lost his rig when the thru-deck bolts broke. I had one chainplate leak (starboard cap shroud) a few years ago and I rebedded it. Then I recently decided to replace all the shroud bolts (3/8" x 3") as a prophylactic measure. The first bolt I removed was the one that had leaked. The head of the bolt broke right off as my son twisted it. Beware. I generally like the chainplate arrangement on the 382, but it obviously pays to prevent leaks and check the bolts occasionally. I have replaced stern chainplate bolts, but for bow chainplates, the nuts holding the bolts seem essentially impossible to access and I have not had the energy to figure out how to get the bolts out and then back in. They surely get a lot of salt water splashing over them.IMG_20210403_144435251.jpg
 
I replaced those bolts a couple years ago, and the don't seem to be leaking. It's a reasonably easy job for 2 people, and every Morgan needs to have it done at this age. The bolts on the bow, I really need to figure out. I can easily reach the nuts with my hand through the locker, and a long extension (maybe with a u-joint) will work with a breaker bar. Those nuts are REALLY rusted.

My rigger has suggested that 2 heat guns, one on the inside and one on the outside, and the 5200 will loosen easily. I hope he is right.
 

datswite

Ken Ferrari
I replaced those bolts a couple years ago, and the don't seem to be leaking. It's a reasonably easy job for 2 people, and every Morgan needs to have it done at this age. The bolts on the bow, I really need to figure out. I can easily reach the nuts with my hand through the locker, and a long extension (maybe with a u-joint) will work with a breaker bar. Those nuts are REALLY rusted.

My rigger has suggested that 2 heat guns, one on the inside and one on the outside, and the 5200 will loosen easily. I hope he is right.
I was able to remove the nuts from the forestay chainplate pretty easily. Unfortunately, I couldn't get the bolts out to replace them. There simply wasn't enough room to tap them out from the inside, and I was unable to apply enough torque to them from the outside. I reluctantly put the nuts back on without replacing.
 

terry_thatcher

Terence Thatcher
One way to do it may be to drill off the heads and pound them in from the outside. But that would take powerful drill and patience and might damage the chainplate.
 
I'm still busy with other stuff. But it seems it would be relatively easy to pound out? If you can get a socket on it with an extension to outside the locker, surely a steel bar on the bolt and hit it from the outside to locker?

My concern is the 5200, and that pounding on the bolt would be more likely to break something and still not get the bolt out. In a worst case scenario, damage the bolt so you can't put a nut on it, and still not get it out. I am hoping that with enough heat it won't take very much torque to turn them.
 

bob_mcdonald

robert mcdonald
There is a product called Debond Marine Formula, made in or around Fort Pierce, Florida which does a great job of breaking down 5200. I have used it on a couple of deck fittings with great success. Does not damage gelcoat.
 
There is a product called Debond Marine Formula, made in or around Fort Pierce, Florida which does a great job of breaking down 5200. I have used it on a couple of deck fittings with great success. Does not damage gelcoat.
I am aware of the debonder. But will it work if you can't apply it to the 5200 or work it with a knife? The 5200 is in the bolthole, under the stem fitting.

5200 does soften with heat. Like heating red loctite. A rigger looked at it and thinks with a couple heatguns on each end of the bolt it will be easy.

We will see. i am tackling motor mounts and engine alignment first.
 
I used that on a thru hull that I replaced. it will work, it seeps in, but you have to give it some time. Once out, make sure to clean the area with acetone before applying your new sealant when you re-install with new fasteners.
 
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