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383 rudder bushing

My 383 rudder shaft has lot of clearance between the shaft and the tube in the hull does anyone know if there is a replacement bushing for that. Thanks
 
I'm not sure that there is a bushing. I believe that it is supported by the gudgeons at the lower side, and shaft packing at the top.
 
Ya I'm not sure but when I'm under way and my liner drive auto pilot makes a turn putting pressure on the quadrant it has about 1/2 to 9/16 play , thanks
 
I would start by checking/replacing the rudder packing. The skeg will flex when under load, so some movement is normal. Your gudgeons could also be worn, I think most probably are an these boats and some of us have fabricated bushings for them. I have never measured the movement on mine, but was alarmed when I first saw it. New packing helped. I also added HDPE bushings in the gudgeons.
 
Ok thanks, I'm pulling the rudder when I haul out next week, wasn't sure about the bushing if there was one I wonder if Ted brewer would have that info on the plans or drawings of the 383
 
There are several threads on rudder removal, cutlass, bearing, and the gudgeons. It is worth reading through them before you start. Dropping the rudder isn't terribly difficult. I did it by myself, but needed a second person to reinstall. You will need to either dig a hole, or block the boat rather high. You will then be able to see the construction.
 
Ok thanks, I just talked to a guy who said there is a bronze fitting at the bottom of the shaft tube with 4 screws, its where the shaft enters the bottom of the hull ,do you know anything about that
 
I actually am looking at the drawing now. What is shows is the bronze tube that the packing nut screws unto, and describes it as "Cast Bronze Bearing - set in 5200" The bottom of that tube has a flange with 3 screws. I don't recall seeing the flange or screws on mine. They were probably filled and faired over.

This "bearing" doesn't support the rudder anywhere other than at the top where the packing/net is. It is just a cast bronze pipe with treads on the top for the packing nut.
 

terry_thatcher

Terence Thatcher
the gudgeons wear. Bronze is softer than the stainless rudder stock. But if your rudder stock is moving up by the quadrant, it sounds like a packing issue. The packing is 1/2" if I recall correctly. Search "gudgeons"
is the archives.
 

jimcleary

James M. Cleary
Hardin

As Warren says, the fit through the bronze tube is a loose fit with the packing keeping the shaft centered and watertight. The bronze gudgeon fitting at the lower part of the skeg is where a close fitting is required to keep the rudder from wobbling. If when the boat is up out of the water, if you can hold the bottom of the rudder and shake it back and forth, with noticeable movement, then its the gudgeon causing the problem. There are a couple of threads on the board concerning the tackling of this problem. Over time the bronze of the fitting gets worn and sloppy. You can have a new bronze casting made $$$$$, have the existing fitting built-up with bronze and remachined $$$, or you can build up the gap between the shaft and the fitting with UHMW polyurethane From McMaster-Carr $. If you have trouble finding the archived threads let Mark Pearson know, he is the site expert.

Jim
 
So then the packing must center the shaft in the bronze tube because when my quadrant has pressure from the auto pilot the shaft moves about 1/2 or so but the shaft packing is leaking water I put new packing in last year but I haven't adjusted the nut after putting 1k miles on it .my autopilot is hooked to a tiller arm on the quadrant, I sure thank you for that info ,you said you were looking at a drawing for that unit is that from ted brewer
 
Hardin

As Warren says, the fit through the bronze tube is a loose fit with the packing keeping the shaft centered and watertight. The bronze gudgeon fitting at the lower part of the skeg is where a close fitting is required to keep the rudder from wobbling. If when the boat is up out of the water, if you can hold the bottom of the rudder and shake it back and forth, with noticeable movement, then its the gudgeon causing the problem. There are a couple of threads on the board concerning the tackling of this problem. Over time the bronze of the fitting gets worn and sloppy. You can have a new bronze casting made $$$$$, have the existing fitting built-up with bronze and remachined $$$, or you can build up the gap between the shaft and the fitting with UHMW polyurethane From McMaster-Carr $. If you have trouble finding the archived threads let Mark Pearson know, he is the site expert.

Jim
Thanks jim
 

jimcleary

James M. Cleary
Hardin
A problem I ran into when I tried to repack the rudder stuffing box was, with new packing and the nut tightened as tight as I could get it, the gland still leaked badly. It was frustrating. I repacked again and even made a wrench just for tightening the big nut, no joy. Upon further inspection, I found that there was debris (resin) stuck in the threads of the stuffing box. Not the threads of the nut. The nut would never tighten properly because the little lump of resin prevented the full travel. A wire brush chucked in a drill cleared the debris and Bobs your uncle.

Another thing you might investigate is the angle that your autopilots tiller arm exerts pressure on the rudder stock. The pressure should all be a rotational force and not side force on the rudder shaft.

Jim
 

terry_thatcher

Terence Thatcher
John English: I want to replace my packing nut with a Tides system. Am I correct that it just screws onto the existing threads or do I need to replace the threaded bronze tube that goes through the boat? If the latter, I will need to figure out the thread size and pitch somehow. Thanks.
 
My conversion was over 20 years ago. I'm not certain where my records for rudder post stuffing box dimensional specifications have gone. The Tides product does screw on to the existing threads. I spent 6 months at anchor with no rudder or post without sinking EM rudder accessory on the Monitor wInd vane provided directional control..............smooth water of course
Ya know I thought that a flax packed stuffing box was a rotational water seal. When did it become a bearing?
 
Hardin
A problem I ran into when I tried to repack the rudder stuffing box was, with new packing and the nut tightened as tight as I could get it, the gland still leaked badly. It was frustrating. I repacked again and even made a wrench just for tightening the big nut, no joy. Upon further inspection, I found that there was debris (resin) stuck in the threads of the stuffing box. Not the threads of the nut. The nut would never tighten properly because the little lump of resin prevented the full travel. A wire brush chucked in a drill cleared the debris and Bobs your uncle.

Another thing you might investigate is the angle that your autopilots tiller arm exerts pressure on the rudder stock. The pressure should all be a rotational force and not side force on the rudder shaft.

Jim
Thanks for that info,you guys are the best!
 
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