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120v Outlets

chandlerabney

New Member
Hello Folks,

I bought a 1982 38ft Morgan almost a year ago. The owner died and the boat was left unattended for at least a year and a half. It lost shore power and when the family finally decided to get rid of the boat, water was a couple of inches above the floor and also had a termite problem. We took a risk and decided to motor it 18hrs to her new home, with neither one of us having any experience other than a Jon Boat LOL. Somehow we made it safe.

The previous owner had really dropped some money into before he passed (43hp beta marine only had 16hrs on it when purchased, new transmission, new VHF radio, GPS, Depth Finder, AIS, main sail, batteries, Air conditioner, hydro vain and auto pilot.

We treated the termite problem and are in the process of replacing all of the damaged wood, but I have not been able to get the 120v outlets to work.

Where is the power inverter that runs the 120v outlets in the cabin? What are the steps to solving this issue?

I'm still trying to familiarize myself with all of the systems on these larger boats.

TIA
 

terry_thatcher

Terence Thatcher
Be careful with the AC. I do my own DC work, but hire ABYC certified electricians to work on the AC.

There is no way of knowing what the previous owner did. The original Morgan plan was to have a 120V marine plug in the stern, just behind the cockpit. There was a household switch/breaker inside the aft cockpit locker. They they ran wires from there under the cockpit coaming to an AC panel next to the DC panel by the chart table. Wires went from there to the water heater in the galley and to outlets in the galley, in the book shelf, in the head, in the forecastle and next to the starboard pilot berth. Unless replaced, the wiring was typically three conductor stranded copper. If you look behind one of the outlets, you should find some. T`he outlets are for shoreside use (not bad, per se, but 40 years old now). I think the port side circuit is all protected by the galley's GFCI plug. There was no inverter to power the outlets. Not up to current ABYC standards. If your vessel has an air conditioner, they might have upgraded, however.
 

jimcleary

James M. Cleary
Tia
As Terry writes, the original 120V system on our Morgans was not built to current ABYC standards. As a retired electrician from NYC, I can attest to the fact that the 120V system as it came from the factory was outright dangerous. On our boat the system has been removed. If your boat has not been updated by an ABYC certified electrician, I would be very careful with it's use.

Jim
 

chandlerabney

New Member
Be careful with the AC. I do my own DC work, but hire ABYC certified electricians to work on the AC.

There is no way of knowing what the previous owner did. The original Morgan plan was to have a 120V marine plug in the stern, just behind the cockpit. There was a household switch/breaker inside the aft cockpit locker. They they ran wires from there under the cockpit coaming to an AC panel next to the DC panel by the chart table. Wires went from there to the water heater in the galley and to outlets in the galley, in the book shelf, in the head, in the forecastle and next to the starboard pilot berth. Unless replaced, the wiring was typically three conductor stranded copper. If you look behind one of the outlets, you should find some. T`he outlets are for shoreside use (not bad, per se, but 40 years old now). I think the port side circuit is all protected by the galley's GFCI plug. There was no inverter to power the outlets. Not up to current ABYC standards. If your vessel has an air conditioner, they might have upgraded, however.

Thanks for the feedback,

So the 120v system only works when connected to shore power?
 

jimcleary

James M. Cleary
There was no inverter in the original system. Owners may have added upgrades to the boat. We have a 600 watt true sine wave inverter that is used to charge tool batteries, phones, etc.

Jim
 

dickkilroy

Richard Kilroy
I wouldn’t trust anything on the original Morgan 120 V outlets. Or more particularly the stern plug-in in order to get the power board. That’s fitting was a piece of junk.
 
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