HuskaBean Transatlantic Videos

Discussion in 'Main Morgan 38 Sailboat Forum' started by datswite, Aug 25, 2019.

  1. datswite

    datswite Ken Ferrari

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    Here are a few videos from our recent west-to-east transatlantic. The first video was taken by our crew member. It's hard to capture wave height with a camera, but this video does pretty ok. So, if they look big here, imagine how they look in real life. lol









     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2019
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  2. mpearson

    mpearson Mark Pearson Staff Member

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    Thanks for sharing the videos, Ken. And also the masthead crack experience. I promptly got out the high resolution photos of my rig inspection last year and scrutinized them anew. Ours appears to be good.

    Yes, we have experienced the flattening effect on wave photos/video multiple times. First time was in a gale in the Aegean Sea, Greece. The waves were in the 15 ft range and scared the crap out of me. The video looked positively tame, no big deal!

    How tall would you say the waves were in the first video?
    Cheers,
    -Mark
     
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  3. datswite

    datswite Ken Ferrari

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    Move away!!

    The waves in the first video weren't enormous, mostly 8'-10', I'd guess. The largest we saw occurred when we were caught in the compression zone of a low pressure system a few hundred miles southwest of Faial. We spent the night hove-to in gale force winds, gusting 48 knots. I was on watch at sunrise, and I feel confident in my assessment that the waves were 18'-20'. One of the most beautiful and humbling moments of my life. We had another certified gale approaching, and we needed to make it to the Azores ASAP. Sailing through those monsters was pretty amazing and, thankfully, short-lived. We were heading east and the low was moving west.
     
  4. jimcleary

    jimcleary James M. Cleary

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    Ken

    Years ago on a sail from New York to Bermuda on a friends 38' LeCompt, we were caught in the edge of a tropical storm that came off of Georgia. There was 30 kts of wind from the southeast and 15' seas from two directions, SE and SW. In daylight we were able to steer up, over and around the wave patterns. At night we couldn't see the approaching waves to steer at them properly. We decided to heave to until we could see again. With a triple reefed main and a 90% working jib backwinded we laid quietly for 5 hours. The main and the helm wanted the boat to round up and the backwinded jib pushed the bow off the wind. We all rested below, not really sleeping, and the boat performed well. When, in the early dawn, we could see the waves again, we released the jib sheet and continued on our way. During the night we had drifted about 8 miles backward. The whole heaving to event was just like a textbook exercise.

    Jim
     
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  5. Mitchell S Allen

    Mitchell S Allen Member

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    Wow, Thank you for posting your videos. They are very "inspirational" for me.
    A question that perhaps has been answered, but I don't see it so far. What was your average speed, and best day distance covered?
    Thank you!
    Mitchell
     
  6. datswite

    datswite Ken Ferrari

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    Thanks, Mitchell. I don't have my logbook with me right now, but I'm pretty certain our best 24-hour run was 155 nm. Average speed between the St. Marin and the Azores was 5.6 knots - that includes being hove to for over 25 hours (probably closer to 6 knots if you don't consider being hove to).
     
  7. datswite

    datswite Ken Ferrari

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    Jim, did you try to heave-to without the jib? We found that, with a triple reefed main, we didn't need any headsail at all. In fact, we were able to heave-to in lighter winds (i.e. 25 knots) with just 2 reefs, no jib.
     
  8. datswite

    datswite Ken Ferrari

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    Here's another video from the trip... I suppose, technically the first leg. We were originally intending to leave from Antigua, and that is where our crew member joined us. However, after waiting for a weather window for over a week, we got tired of sitting around. So we decided to make an overnight downwind run to St. Martin. Provisioning was much easier and cheaper there, so why not? Anyway, it shows our downwind setup. Love our whisker pole!

     
  9. jimcleary

    jimcleary James M. Cleary

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    Ken
    With just a deep reefed main up, how did you position the helm?

    Jim
     
  10. datswite

    datswite Ken Ferrari

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    Hard to windward and lashed. She showed no tendency to round-up or fall off. We rode 50-60 degrees of the wind. As I mentioned previously, we did forereach a bit. That would have been a big problem in breaking seas. Our Jordan Series Drogue was rigged and ready, and I would have deployed it if the conditions deteriorated to the point of posing a capsize risk.
     

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